Send more DIY postcards


I love to bring the concept of crafting with a purpose to my classes! 
Kids can paint watercolor postcards and then mail them to people they love. 
Art and kindness are a great reminder of how beautiful life can be!

Supplies used 
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Tutorial

Heart postcards - wet on dry


First thing is to plan your white space in case you want to add a quote later. Choose the space you want to use and block it with masking tape.
Wet on dry technique: Mix water into the paint on a palette and get your brush saturated with color and paint a heart. If the kid is unsure about painting it, you can outline hearts with a pencil, but do it very lightly so the lines will not show up later.
Ombre effect: use two different colors, one for each half of the heart. When you are ready to blend it, take a clean wet brush and keep tapping the water on the paper until the colors blend.
When the postcard is completely dry, pull off the masking tape and choose a beautiful quote to your art!


Watercolor and flower doodles– Wet on Wet

First thing is to plan your white space in case you want to add a quote later. Choose the space you want to use and block it with masking tape.
Wet on Wet technique: Dip your brush in water and create a small puddle of water on your paper.  Dip your brush in a color from your watercolor palette. Touch the puddle with the color and watch the colors spread. Drop in additional colors to create different effects. Fill a whole page with the watercolor blobs.
Make sure that the watercolor is dry before starting to doodle the flowers with a very fine point marker like this one. Add additional color and patterns with markers around the blobs too! Don't forget to choose a beautiful quote to make your postcards even more thoughtful!


Watermelon - wet on wet

Start by drawing a light, triangular outline of the watermelon slice with a pencil. Draw lightly so that the pencil lines don't show through your paint later on.
Mix red with some water on your palette and spread it over the top section of the watermelon slice. Keep bringing the color down to create a shade effect.
Dip your brush up into green and paint the bottom section of the rind. Add a bit of yellow on the top of it to create an ombré effect.
Leave a little white space between the lighter yellow-green and the pink part of the watermelon.


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